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Personal Tax Changes 2016 Tax Season

Personal Tax Changes 2016 Tax Season

Personal Tax Changes for 2016 Tax Season

Personal Tax Changes for 2016 Tax Season

Changes and Updates for 2016 Tax season

We will discuss the personal tax changes 2016 tax season in this article. Following key changes to existing services, credits, and amounts impact individual taxpayers in the 2016 tax-filing season:

  • Updated notice of assessment – The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has updated the format of the notice of assessment to be simpler. Taxpayers can now find the most important information about the assessment on the first page.
  • Universal child care benefit (UCCB) – For the 2015 tax year, the UCCB was expanded to children aged 6 through 17. Also, payments that parents receive for children under the age of 6 increased to $160 per month for each child. To learn more about the UCCB read our full blog post here. This Personal Tax Changes 2016 Tax Season was implemented before 2016.
  • Disability Tax Credit – This year, Canadians claiming the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) will be able to file their T1 return online regardless of whether or not their Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate has been submitted to the CRA for that tax year.
  • Children’s fitness amount – As of January 1, 2015, this is now a refundable tax credit available to families with children enrolled in a prescribed program of physical activity. For tax years prior to 2015, this credit was non-refundable. The Children’s Fitness Tax Credit allows you to claim eligible fees paid in the year up to a maximum of $500 per child (an additional amount of $500 is available if the child is eligible for the Disability Tax Credit and a minimum of $100 has been paid for eligible fees in the year). The child must have been under 16 years of age (or under 18 years of age if eligible for the disability tax credit) at the beginning of the year in which an eligible fitness expense was paid.
  • Child Care Expense Deduction limits – As of the 2015 tax year, the Child Care Expense Deduction dollar limits have increased by $1,000. The maximum amounts that can be claimed have increased to $8,000 for children under age seven, to $5,000 for children aged seven through 16, and to $11,000 for children who are eligible for the Disability Tax Credit.

For more information on the above key changes that may impact you, contact Cheema CPA Professional Corporation. Cheema CPA can help you understand personal tax changes 2016 tax season.  Visit the CRA website for more personal tax changes and updates 2016 tax season.

Filing Past Due Tax Returns

Past Tax Returns

Filing Past Due Tax Returns

 Filing Past Due Tax Returns

Filing taxes can be an overwhelming task with numerous things to consider. If you have fallen behind on your returns it is very important to file the past due tax returns and update your records with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). By filing taxes you become eligible for government credits such as GST/HST tax credit, Ontario Trillium Tax Credit (OTB), and Child Tax Benefits tax credit.

Failure to file tax returns on time can result in penalties and interest. Even if you are not able to pay the tax balance owing, you should still file your return to reduce the penalties and take advantage of the tax credits you qualify for.

If you are expecting a refund from the CRA it is even more critical to file your tax returns on time because the CRA does not pay interest until 30 days after the due date. Also the CRA can deny your income tax refund if you wait more than three years (CRA discretion to issue the refund if the return is filed within 0 years).

I have zero income should I still file a tax return? 

Even if you are not required to file a tax return, it might be beneficial to file a tax return because you could qualify for government credits. It is very important to file taxes every year even if you have zero income. Eligibility for certain benefits such as the GST/HST credit or the Child Tax Benefits is directly related to your income tax returns.

If I file past due returns, can I still receive the GST/HST tax credit? 

Yes, you will receive the GST/HST tax credit along with other credits you qualify for. You can retroactively qualify for the GST and OTB tax credits.

What is the late filing penalty? 

The late filing penalty is based on taxes owing for a particular year. For an example if you owe tax for 2014 and do not file your return for 2014 on time the CRA will charge you a 5% penalty on the balance owing. In additional the CRA will charge a 1% penalty on the balance owing for each full month your return is late, to a maximum of 12 months.

If the CRA charged a late-filing penalty on your return for 2011, 2012, or 2013 your late-filing penalty for 2014 may be 10% of your 2014 balance owing, plus 2% of your 2014 balance owing for each full month your return is late, to a maximum of 20 months.

Even if you cannot pay your full balance owing on or before April 30, 2015, you can avoid the late-filing penalty by filing your return on time.

Who should I contact if I have to file back taxes for multiple years? 

Contact our firm for all your income tax needs. We specialize in filings back taxes and reducing penalties and interest. We have several different strategies that we use to reduce penalties and interest, including the Voluntary Disclosure Program. We can  help you comply with the CRA reporting obligations and minimize your overall tax bill. Contact our firm and book an appointment with our accountant Mr. Sarb Cheema.

Income Splitting Family Tax Cut

 

Mississauga Accountant

Save Taxes

How the Family Tax Cut actually work?

The Canadian tax system taxes individuals and families based on there marginal tax rate. The more money you make the more tax you pay. As a result, when one person in a family has all the income, they end-up paying more tax than if the income was split amongst the couple. As an example, if the husband has $100,000 taxable income and the wife has zero taxable income, they would end up paying more tax than if they each had $50,000 taxable income. This is where the Income Splitting Family Tax Cut comes in and transfers part of the income to the lower income spouse.

The Family Tax Cut allows a spouse to transfer up to $50,000 of taxable income to a spouse in a lower income tax bracket, providing tax relief up to a maximum of $2,000. To qualify for this tax credit the both partners have to complete their tax return at the same time. This credit is effective for the 2014 tax year and subsequent tax years after.

Who can apply for the income splitting Family Tax Cut in 2014? 

  • You are a resident of Canada on December 31, 2014
  • You have an eligible spouse or common-law partner for 2014 and they have not claimed the Family Tax Cut;
  • You have a child who is under 18 at the end of 2014, who ordinarily lives with you throughout the year
  • You were not confined to a prison or similar institution for a period of at least 90 days during the year;
  • Neither you nor your eligible spouse became bankrupt in the year;
  • Neither you nor your eligible spouse elected to split eligible pension income in the year; and
  • Both you and your eligible spouse file an income tax and benefit return for the year.

 Can the credit be split?

The Family Tax Cut can not be split and has to be claimed by one spouse.

 How to apply?

The credit can be claimed on your T1 personal income tax return on Schedule 1-A and enter the calculated amount on line 423 of the Schedule 1.

Cheema CPA Professional Corporation
Contact Cheema Chartered Professional Accountants for your 2014 personal & corporate tax needs. We optimize every tax return and will automatically consider your family for the income splitting family tax cut credit. Book an appointment now using our web-app:

Personal Income Tax Returns–> We have expertise in preparing taxes for:

Individuals Executives Pension Income-Splitting
Families Employee Expenses Late filed returns
Self Employed Investment Income Investment portfolios
Rental Properties Capital Gains/Losses Non-Resident

Corporate Tax Returns–> We have expertise in preparing taxes for:

Corporation Tax Returns Accounting and Bookkeeping Late Filed Returns
Corporation Tax Planning Financial Statements  Sales Tax Returns (HST/GST/QST/PST)
Notice To Reader Reports Payroll filings (T4, T5) CRA Audit & Appeals
Have a Question?
Ask your tax questions on our online questions forum.

CRA Audit of Moving Expenses

 

CRA Audits Moving Expenses

CRA Audits Moving Expenses

CRA audit of moving expenses

The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) allows taxpayers to deduct moving expenses if they move closer to work or school. To qualify, the new residence should be at least 40 kilometers closer to work or school (measured by the shortest usual public route).

In the case of Trudy Hauser (Taxpayer) vs. Her Majesty The Queen (The Crown), the CRA audited the moving expenses of the taxpayer.  The main argument became how each of the parties were measuring the distance between the old home and the new place of work. The Crown had measured the distance using an urban route, which was the shortest distance. The Taxpayer had measured the distance using a rural route, which was the fastest route. The Taxpayer had indicated that the urban route was inefficient because of the construction on the route.

Despite the Taxpayers testimony and evidence The Tax Court sided with the Canada Revenue Agency and concluded that the urban route is the most appropriate route to measure the distance between the new place of work and the old home.

Read more about Trudy Hauser  case – CRA Audit of Moving Expenses below:

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Audit & Appeal

Our team is dedicated to assist you in all your CRA appeals. We make sure that your company’s tax audit is handled smoothly and efficiently. We can assist you with the tax audit process starting from the information gathering stage to negotiation with the tax authorities. We can also help in negotiating payments and even apply for interest or penalty relief.

Brampton Tax Accountants

Tax Accountant

Tax Accountant

Cheema & Assocaite – Your Local Brampton Tax Accountants 

Cheema & Associate CPA Professional Corporation is an accounting firm located in Brampton, Ontario at the main intersection of Kennedy Rd S and Clarence St. Our office address is 143 Clarence st. Suite 5, Brampton ON L6W 1T2.

We provide income tax services to all types of clients from Brampton. We have been serving the Brampton market for over three years. Tax has evolved over the years with strict regulations imposed by the Canada Revenue Agency. We can professionally prepare your tax returns while maximizing your refund by designing and catering unique tax planning strategies. Our professionals have experience in handling wide rage of unique tax returns. Contact us for your 2014 personal income tax returns.

Our Brampton tax accountants are dedicated in assisting you in all your income tax needs.

Personal Income Tax
Personal tax has evolved over the years with strict regulations imposed by the Canada Revenue Agency. Your local Brampton tax accountants can professionally prepare your tax return while maximizing your refund by designing and catering unique tax planning strategies. Our professionals have experience in handling wide rage of unique tax returns.

Corporate Tax
Our uniquely designed tax programs can assist you with complying with the complicated provisions of the Income Tax Act (ITA) while minimizing tax liabilities. We can structure your business to maximize profitability and minimize tax risks.Contact us for your 2014 corporate tax returns.

Audit & Appeal
Our team is dedicated to assist you in all your CRA appeals. We make sure that your company’s tax audit is handled smoothly and efficiently. We can assist you with the tax audit process – starting from the information gathering stage to negotiation with the tax authorities. We can also help in negotiating payments and even apply for interest or penalty relief.

2014 Ontario Personal Income Tax Rates

Ontario Tax Rates 2014

Ontario Tax Rates 2014

2014 Ontario Personal Income Tax Rates

As with other years the Ontario government has changed some of the tax brackets and rates for 2014. The major changes were:

  • Lowered the taxable income threshold for the 13.16% tax rate from $514,090 to 220,000
  • Added a new tax rate of 12.16% on taxable income between $150,000 to $220,000

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Non-resident eligibility of child tax benefits and GST/HST rebate

Non-residents - Child Tax Benefits

Non-residents – Child Tax Benefits

Tracking Canadians emigrating to other parts of the word has become a serious challenge for the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). Over the past several years the CRA has begun targeting non-residents claiming child tax benefits and GST/HST rebates. This has created confusion among taxpayers in determine if they qualify for these benefits while they are residents/non-residents. Although a taxpayer files tax returns as a resident, they still may not be eligible for the child tax benefits and GST/HST.

This is exactly what happened with a Calgary family living in China for the past several years and filing tax returns as residents. Although the tax returns were accepted by the CRA, they have still assessed the family with $18,000 tax bill for child tax benefits and gst/hst rebates for which the CRA claims they did not qualify for.

 

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CRA uses Facebook to audit

Why did the CRA audit me?

Why did the CRA audit me?

CRA uses Facebook to audit

The CRA only provides a generic description on how they select files for audit. According to the CRA website, they select files based several different conditions, such as “the potential for errors in tax returns or indications of non-compliance with tax obligations.”

Techniques used by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) are never clearly disclosed. Over the years the CRA has adapted and developed unconventional audit techniques in hopes of catching tax evaders. One of these techniques is called Indirect Verification of Income, where the CRA tries to match a taxpayer’s lifestyle to their reported income. In order to do this the CRA has relied on sources such as Facebook and other social media outlets to build cases against taxpayers.

With falling tax revenues and increasing deficits governments will continue to use unconventional audit techniques if it results in more taxes being collected.

How to setup a business in Ontario?

What type of structure is right for you?

How to setup a business in Ontario?

Setting up a business can be an overwhelming task with a lot to comprehend. It all starts with a dream and a vision, but how do you turn that dream into reality. The dream of becoming your own boss and having the freedom to make your own decisions can be a complicated one at the beginning. Once you have determined on the actual business and its inner workings, you will have to move on to the next step of executing that business. This is where a lot of people get stuck and don’t really know where to go next.

In this article I will explore and shed light on several different business structures available in Ontario. I will also explain how to be in compliance with Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) tax obligations.

The three most common structures are Sole proprietorship, Partnership, and Incorporation.

Read more